Governments

FGBC Green Local Government Certifications

As of 10/31/14

The Florida Green Building Coalition's Green Local Government Designation program recognizes cities and counties for achievements in outstanding environmental stewardship. To earn certification, a municipality must employ a comprehensive list of criteria and meet a minimum level of points, organized in terms of department functions, which are outlined in the FGBC Green Local Government Standard. The Standard focuses on improving environmental performance through a number of mediums: energy, water, air, land, and waste; and evaluates environmental practices done in-house, incentives and ordinances that foster green practices, and educational activities for the community to improve the environment.

Aventura
Certified: 11/2/10
Level: Silver
Points: 26%
Version: 2

Charlotte County
Certified: 5/24/11
Level: Silver
Points: 26%
Version: 2

Charlotte County Building Code Specialist Julia Galofre (3rd from left) and FGBC President Jennifer Languell (2nd from right) present Charlotte County officials with the FGBC Green Local Government flag and certificate.

Clearwater
Certified: 11/5/09 Expired
Level: Silver
Points: 29%
Version: 1

The City of Clearwater has earned the silver-level FGBC Green Local Government Designation by demonstrating environmentally friendly practices and implementing green policies. Clearwater has developed their environmental goals and taken inventory of their greenhouse gasses. A large portion of their fleet is comprised of alternatively fueled vehicles, including the police department that utilizes bicycles and electric vehicles for pier and neighborhood patrols. Bicycle and pedestrian traffic is encouraged in the community and continues to guide transportation planning, recreation facilities, conservation, education and economic development. Regular efforts are made to enhance the connectivity of the network. The City of Clearwater demonstrates coastal management practices through its participation in the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Clean Marina program and the Blue Wave Campaign. Clearwater has also brought trash to treasure by converting closed landfills into community parks. All major areas of their parks also provide recycling stations to reduce the amount of material entering the waste stream. 

Coral Springs
Certified: 5/8/12
Level: Silver
Points: 36%
Version: 2

Cutler Bay
Certified: 11/19/09 Expired, Recertification Pending
Level: Silver
Points: 25%
Version: 2

Through outreach efforts to its local residents, Cutler Bay promotes green building and sustainability habits.

The Town of Cutler Bay was the first local government to be certified in Miami-Dade County. Cutler Bay achieved the designation by offering green building incentives to encourage environmentally friendly building practices within the town, and by utilizing hybrid and fuel efficient vehicles. It also incorporated timers and energy efficient lighting on the city's sports fields and offers online bill pay for their water utility. Cutler Bay continues to pursue and achieve green goals outlined in their environmental strategic plan. In 2009, Cutler Bay adopted and implemented the green cleaning and maintenance procedures recommended by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FL DEP), and also adopted and implemented an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) program that encourages the purchase and use of environmentally friendly products.

Davie
Certified: 6/29/11
Level: Silver
Points: 22%
Version: 1 

Deland
Certified: 5/3/10
Level: Silver
Points: 28%
Version: 2

Deland, located in Volusia County, introduces its commitment to sustainability to its new employees as part of an employee orientation, and reduces paper cup usage by providing reusable water bottles. Deland has achieved the Florida Main Street Designation in its historic downtown, which is also lit with efficient LED lighting. Deland has also earned Tree City USA honors, has officers trained in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), and encourages green building within the community. The City of Deland excels in vehicle maintenance and operations by implementing Green Fleet Management in its public works and emergency management vehicles. The City also encourages members of the community to conserve resources through their water and stormwater education campaign, offering low flow fixture rebates, and providing solid waste services with volume based rates. Deland also created a reclaimed water infrastructure, a historic preservation ordinance, and offers mulched yard waste for community use. For other green initiatives, visit Deland's website at: http://www.deland.org/Pages/Green.

Doral
Certified: 8/2/12
Level: Bronze
Points: 26%
Version: 3

Dunedin's Green Team accepts the FGBC Green Local Government certificate for the city's platinum-level designation. Center, holding framed certificate is Sustainability Coordinator Christina Perez.

Dunedin
Certified: 11/5/13
Level: Platinum
Points: 71%
Version: 4 

The City of Dunedin incorporated environmental protection into the city's comprehensive plan, became an EnergyStar Partner, and through the local utility company, offers energy audits and workshops to the public. Dunedin monitors and tracks usage in city buildings to look for opportunities for conservation and increased efficiency in the areas of energy use, water use, solid waste reduction and recycling. The City converted 23 traffic signals to LED technology. Electrical savings are averaging $23,000 per year with an estimated two-year payback period. It also constructed a 43,000 s.f. green-certified Community Center for education programs and recreational activities. It has initiated the Sustainability Seminar Series to teach residents conservation techniques with the goal of encouraging changes in behavior. Seminar topics include energy conservation, recycling, composting, saving water and more. There is a follow-up process for each seminar to determine what, if any, barriers exist to changing behavior and how effective the seminars are in fostering that change. Dunedin also teaches environmental preferable purchasing, waste reduction techniques and recycling workshops to local businesses, and provides bicycle racks at all public amenities. The city expanded its curbside collection of large appliances to include electronics. Dunedin has collected and recycled more than 50,000 pounds of e-waste through this program. Dunedin also developed and enacted policies and ordinances to accomplish some environmental objectives. These include:

• Historic preservation ordinance
• Tree preservation ordinance
• Landscape ordinance
• Watering restrictions & conservation water rates
• Maximum utilization of reclaimed water to offset potable usage for irrigation
• Septic system replacement ordinance
• Mitigation for the consumption of natural resources
• Purchasing EnergyStar electronic equipment for in-house use

Upgrade achievements include:
• Enacted green landscaping ordinance for newly constructed government buildings
• Received Florida-Friendly Landscape certification for city parks
• Enacted green building incentives that include fast-track permitting, density bonuses, and 25% reduced parking requirement.
• Offers permit fee rebates to builders who certify their projects under the Florida Green Building or LEED standards.
• Partnered with Habitat for Humanity to construct green certified townhomes for low-income families.
• Offers an annual workshop to educate the community about Dunedin's green building program
• Provides street signage and recognition on the City's website for green building projects.
• Requires mitigation for consumption of natural habitat or resources
• Converted to digital photo storage to minimize photo processing waste
• Installed recycling stations at all city-owned recreational areas

Flagler County
Certified: 6/21/10
Level: Silver
Points: 21%
Version: 2

Flagler County has led the way for environmental stewardship for a number of years with its environmentally sensitive lands purchasing program, trails and thousands of acres of preserves. Through the strategies of the FGBC Green Local Government certification program it was able to realize the economic benefits of "going green". By softening the water in a chiller that provides air conditioning to two government buildings, the County is able to reuse the water more often and save about three million gallons of water a year and $20,000 a year in city utility fees. The chiller plant saves on air conditioning costs by serving two buildings. The County installed an Energy Recovery Ventilator system that uses exhaust air from the buildings to cool or heat fresh air coming into one of the buildings. The process lowers energy loss by as much as 70 percent. Rainwater harvested from rooftops becomes landscaping irrigation water, saving the use of expensive potable water. Rainfall and drainage from the buildings and parking lots is collected in a retention pond and the pond water is used to irrigate lawns and shrubbery. Along with these innovative practices, the County implemented simple habits to reduce costs as well, such as turning off lights in rooms not being used, installing flow restrictors on faucets, cutting back on the thermostat, and implementing recycling programs in their buildings. Recycling programs were also implemented for county residents.

Fort Lauderdale
Certified: 12/13/13
Level: Gold
Points: 51.1%
Version: 4

Fort Lauderdale's enthusiastic and organized approach to sustainability is creating an internal framework that perpetuates accomplishments year after year. It's designated "Green Team's" initial undertaking was to coordinate the City’s internal sustainability programs so that there would be no wasted resources.  By cataloging existing sustainability initiatives, extracting best practices and sharing them throughout the City, successes could be duplicated and their gains magnified.   This resulted in wide application of environmentally responsible procedures such as reducing printing to conserve paper and energy, minimizing or eliminating engine idling to conserve fuel and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and recycling at City facilities. To affect the community's overall sustainability, Fort Lauderdale provides abundant green building incentives, rebates, and education to industry professionals and to the public. One of the city's unique green efforts is to collect mounded seaweed from beaches and use it as compost. This effort is estimated to save the city approximately $180,000 annually, while it also creates rich soil for native plants. View the complete list of Fort Lauderdale's green achievements. 

Gainesville
Certified: 10/31/12
Level: Silver
Points: 36%
Version: 1

Gainesville is well known for its sustainability conscientiousness and green power initiatives. It received much attention when the city's utility company (GRU) created a solar feed-in-tariff (FIT) program to increase the number of solar PV systems in Gainesville.  It has adopted FGBC or LEED green standards as the official minimum criteria for new government buildings and offers incentives to the community for constructing FGBC, LEED or EnergyStar certified buildings.

Hollywood
Certified: 7/9/12
Level: Bronze
Points: 26%
Version: 3

FGBC President Cindy Hall (center) presents the FGBC Certified Green Local Government flag to Hollywood officials and staff who coordinated the certification efforts.

Indian River County 
Certified: 3/5/09 Expired
Level: Gold
Points: 43 %
Version: 1

Indian River County (IRC) has adopted green building standards as the official minimum criteria for new government buildings, plus they have implemented green cleaning and maintenance practices. IRC also encourages Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) programs, conducts a green building awards program and maintains an electronic database of all building energy code compliance. Indian River County developed an eco-tourism campaign, maintains a green fleet, and and assists with greening affordable housing.

Jacksonville
Certified: 5/20/10
Level: Gold
Points: 41.8%
Version: 2

The City of Jacksonville is the 20th Certified FGBC Green Local Government, achieving Gold-level certification with 41.8 percent. Jacksonville implemented an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) program and adopted a green cleaning ordinance for local government buildings. The City also participates in the Florida Clean Marina program, assisted in the creation of organic community gardens, engages in carpool assistance, and provides mitigation audits to homes, businesses and local government buildings to help minimize the impacts of a disaster. The City of Jacksonville utilizes landfill gas as an energy resource, operates energy-efficient LED traffic lights, and trains their police officers in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). Jacksonville provides green building education and incentives, offers green power choices through JEA and provides distributed generation incentives to encourage the adoption of alternative energy technologies.

Jupiter
Certified: 9/17/14
Level: Silver
Points: 22%
Version: 2

Largo
Certified: 12/22/11
Level: Silver
Points: 24%
Version: 1

Maitland
Certified: 9/3/10
Level: Silver
Points: 31%
Version: 2

As part of their water conservation efforts, the City of Maitland conducts water audits. Here, the audit was conducted to address irrigation needs at public ball fields. Through best management practices, and as a result of conducting water audits such as this, the City calculates that it has saved millions of gallons of water since inception of the program.

Manatee County
Certified: 4/19/11; Upgrade 3/4/14
Level: Gold
Points: 44%
Version: 2

Green Achievements included:
• Developed an environmentally preferable purchasing program (EPP)
• Provide incentives for local businesses who utilize EPP or other solid waste reduction strategy
• Implement the use of alternative fuel in school busses and other vehicles
• Maintain staff or group to coordinate current and future green activities
• Enact green landscaping ordinance for local government buildings
• Enact and enforce a tree preservation or land-clearing ordinance
• Apply Florida Friendly landscaping principles at public amenities
• Enact a rain sensor ordinance applicable to all functioning automatic irrigation systems
• Enact a landscaping ordinance for new construction
• Offer free or discounted green products to the public, including rebates for low-flow toilets
• Offer green building or green local government education to the community
• Develop a historic preservation ordinance
• Firing ranges utilize non-lead bullets or trap and collect fragments
• Maintain a Recycling program and recycle of end-of-life electronic equipment
• Enact policy so all electronic equipment purchased has conservation features
• Develop environmental education content for county website, television programs, etc.
• Create an endangered lands conservation / purchasing program
• Take part in Florida Clean Marina program
• Enact manatee protection plan and coastal areas enact sea turtle ordinance
• Provide air and water quality information on county website
• Create a reclaimed water infrastructure
• Maintain organic community gardens
• Minimize chlorine in community swimming pools
• Implement energy efficient lighting & controls for outdoor courts, parks, and playfields
• Utilize integrated pest management
• Utilize solar or other energy efficient streetlights
• Monitor and track building energy usage in the school district
• Construct / renovate green schools
• Involve students in green projects within the school

Martin County 
Certified: 9/10/10
Level: Gold
Points: 46%
Version: 1

Martin County receives a plaque and flag as recognition of their FGBC Green Local Government certification. FGBC President Cindy Hall (3rd from left) made the presentation to County officials.

As of September 10, 2010, when Martin County earned its FGBC Green Local Government certification, it had achieved the second highest score to date by accomplishing 46 percent of FGBC's recommended practices. Martin County has made a significant commitment to establishing policies, guidelines, goals, and strategic actions to promote sustainability and energy conservation throughout the County. It achieved the FGBC Green Local Government designation by employing green cleaning and maintenance practices within their facilities, adopting an Environmentally Preferred Purchasing (EPP) program, launching an eco-tourism campaign, encouraging mixed-use zoning and development, and implementing fast-track permitting for green buildings. The County participates in the clean marina program, recycles their end-of-life office equipment, and provides bicycle racks at all public amenities. County schools have initiated a recycling program and Martin County has enacted energy and water conservation policies to closely monitor and manage consumption with strategies to achieve short- and long-term goals. It was awarded the Florida Department of Environment Protection (FL DEP) plant operations excellence award in 2008 for their water treatment facility.

Miami-Dade County
Certified: 10/11/12
Level: Gold
Points: 57%
Version: 3

Miami-Dade County achieved a gold-level designation by earning 57 percent of its 394 applicable points, the highest score yet accomplished by any local government. Some of the more significant accomplishments were:

The Miami-Dade County School Board green efforts, led by Ana Rijo-Conde in the Department of Planning, Design and Sustainability, included:

North Miami
Certified: 1/27/11
Level: Silver
Points: 28%
Version: 1

From left: FGBC representative Sam Uccello, Mayor Andre Pierre, Councilman Scott Galvin, Councilwoman Erlande Steril, Director of Community Planning & Development Maxine Calloway, Director of Purchasing Ruby Crenshaw-Johnson, Director of Building and Zoning Jacqueline Gonzalez, Councilman Michael Blynn, Councilman Jean Marcellus, Arceli Redila, Public Works Director Aleem Ghany.

The City of North Miami underwent an extensive evaluation of their operations and initiated the following sustainability measures: Participation in Cities for Climate Protection Campaign; Use of alternative fuel vehicles; Adopted green standards as official minimum criteria for new government buildings; Provides incentives for green certified commercial and institutional buildings; Provides incentives for green certified land development projects and green redevelopment; Provide incentives for construction of green affordable housing; Enacted green landscaping ordinance for local government buildings; Offered incentives to create organic farms, or sustainable/water efficient agriculture; Enacted ordinances to promote water conservation and offered rebates on low-flow water fixtures; Enacted ordinances to protect water quality through septic tank replacements; Provides incentives for alternative commuting by local government employees; Provides environmental education to community residents and local government employees; Maintains community organic gardens; Implemented community recycling stations; Implemented energy efficient lighting & controls for outdoor courts, parks, and playfields; Operates and maintains a green fleet maintenance program; and Mandates green cleaning practices in green government buildings.

North Port
Certified: 12/20/11
Level: Gold
Points: 41%
Version: 1

Oldsmar
Certified: 4/16/13
Level: Silver
Points: 32%
Version: 3

The city of Oldsmar 'green team,' with the leadership of Mayor Doug Bevis (3rd from right), enthusiastically undertook the FGBC green local government certification process and earned the city a silver level designation. FGBC Executive Director, Suzanne Cook (front-left), presented the award during a recent City Council meeting.

The city of Oldsmar enthusiastically undertook the FGBC green local government certification process through the leadership of Mayor Doug Bevis, the city's green team, and Council member Linda Norris, who is the epitome of a "green champion." As you enter City Hall, the iconic purple signs indicating reclaimed water is used to irrigate landscaping are evidence of the city's commitment to sustainability. Other significant accomplishments include the use of highly reflective materials or surfaces to minimize heat island effect, providing public transportation route information and alternative commuting options on the internet to encourage the reduction of vehicle miles traveled community wide, and installing LED, solar or other energy-efficient traffic lights, street lights, and crosswalk lights. View the complete list of green achievements.

Orange County
Certified: 2/15/08 Expired, Recertification Pending
Level: Gold
Points: 42%
Version: 1

Orange County was the first "county" to reach gold-level certification under the FGBC Green Local Government Designation. It installed one of the largest solar photovoltaic (PV) array in the southeast on the roof of the Orange County Convention Center, which will allow for a substantial energy savings, and will become a model for clean energy in the community and the nation. It offers green products to the public such as cotton bags for shopping and tire pressure gages to reduce waste and improve fuel efficiency, plus it added hybrid and alternative-fuel vehicles to its fleet. Best management practices are conducted to prevent stormwater pollution and recycling waste. It hosts an awards program that recognizes green building projects and it installed a GIS system with sustainability indicators that assist in community and environmental planning.

Orlando
Certified 11/9/09 Expired
Level: Gold
Points: 42%
Version:2

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Accepting the FGBC Green Local Government Certificate for the City of Orlando are (l-r) Jeff Benavides, Jonathan Ippel, FGBC Project Evaluator Jeremy Nelson,and Mayor Buddy Dyer.

The City of Orlando is currently tied with the cities of Plantation and Tallahassee for the highest score for a city. GreenWorks, an environmental action agenda for Orlando, focuses on action plans to:
• Conserve natural resources and protect the environment
• Invest in green buildings, vehicles and materials
• Foster alternative transportation options
• Increase the amount of trees and green spaces in the City
• Provide residents the tools and information they need to become more environmentally responsible
• Work together as a community to combat the urgent threat of global climate change

The LYNX Transportation system utilizes biodiesel, their police department utilizes lead free bullets for training, and the city encourages EnergyStar, green building and the Florida Friendly Landscaping Program in the community. The City of Orlando built the first LEED certified fire station in the state of Florida and has realized significant savings by installing LED traffic lights. Orlando further demonstrates environmental leadership by offering a green business workshop program to teach waste reduction strategies and encourage environmentally friendly purchasing to businesses.

Ormond Beach
Certified: 11/23/10
Level: Silver
Points: 24%
Version: 2

From back left: Commissioners James Stowers (zone 1), Commissioner Troy Kent (zone 2), Mayor Ed Kelley, Commissioner Rick Boehm (zone 3), Commissioner Bill Partington (zone 4), city Manager Joyce Shanahan
Front (l-r): FGBC member Ralph Locke and Board member Stephanie Thomas-Rees

Ormond Beach monitors and tracks its energy and water use, participates in the Cities for Climate Protection campaign, and dedicated a staff person to coordinate green activities. In other planning measures, the city purchased alternative fuel vehicles, adopted green cleaning and maintenance practices, established a recycling program for electronic equipment, and developed a funding mechanism for historic preservation. Green building education is provided to the community through both printed materials and website content. To protect its natural resources, Ormond Beach enacted a sea turtle ordinance, manatee protection plan, and boat facility siting plan. Energy conservation was addressed by the installation of LED traffic lights and solar or other energy efficient street lights. Waste reduction is addressed through recycling programs and the operations of a reuse/swap store.

Osceola County
Certified: 10/17/12
Level: Silver
Points: 32%
Version: 4

Palm Bay
Certified: 7/1/09 Expired, Recertification Pending
Level: Silver
Points: 21%
Version: 1

Palm Bay adopted green cleaning and maintenance practices available from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FL DEP), operates an alternative fueling station for its fleet, and developed a reward program for employees that demonstrate environmental innovation within the Public Works Department. The City encourages water conservation by utilizing block rate structures for its utility customers, and by sponsoring a showerhead exchange program. Green activities also exist within emergency services, the police force is trained in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) and the city provides disaster mitigation incentives.

Palm Beach County
Certified: 9/4/12
Level: Silver
Points: 42%
Version: 4

FGBC former Board member Kyle Abney (R) presents Palm Beach County officials and staff with the certified FGBC Green Local Government flag and framed certificate. Pictured (L-R) Donald Campbell, Juliana Suarez-Mitnik, Kenny Wilson, Susan Chapman, Anne Gannon, Paul Strauss, John Reiser, Bonnie Finneran, Robert Robbins, Bevin Beaudet, Jon Van Arnam, Commissioner Shelly Vana, Rowan Hughes, Rebecca Caldwell, and Kyle Abney.

Palm Coast
Certified: 2/20/09; Upgrade 3/23/10  
Level: Gold
Points: 45%
Version: 2

Originally certified at the Silver level with 25 percent, Palm Coast reach Gold level with 45 percent via the upgrade process on March 23, 2010. The City of Palm Coast encourages water conservation by requiring developments to include native, drought-tolerant vegetation (at least 50%) in landscape plans. It minimizes the amount of chlorine in their community swimming pools, and coordinates the City's intricate bicycle/pedestrian network into the transportation planning process. Palm Coast uses their recycling revenue to directly fund special recycling programs, green education and publicity including Christmas Tree recycling events, sustainability workshops and the city's Arbor Day celebration. Palm Coast received the Plant Operations Excellence Award from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FL DEP) for water resource management.

Pinecrest
Certified: 5/8/12
Level: Silver
Points: 37%
Version: 3

Pinecrest Community Center Left to right:  Cynthia Everett (Village Attorney), Councilmember Jeff Cutler, Mayor Cindy Lerner, Councilmember Joe Corradino, Vice Mayor Nancy Harter, Councilmember Bob Ross, FGBC Board member Lisa Stephens, and Yocelyn Galiano (Village Manager).

Pinellas County
Recertified: 11/19/12
Level: Gold
Points: 52%
Version: 4
Pinellas County was the first local government in the state to earn the FGBC Green Local Government certification in 2006 and now is the first in the state to complete the 5-year recertification process. In those five years, Pinellas has pumped up their sustainability efforts and gone from earning a silver-level at 32 percent in 2006 to gold level with 52 percent.

Certified: 10/27/06 Expired
Level: Silver
Points: 32%
Version: 1

FGBC President Mike Houston presents the County with their Green Local Government certificate. Pinellas County was the first local government in the state to receive the Florida Green Local Government Designation.

Plantation
Certified: 6/26/09 Expired, Recertification Pending
Level: Gold
Points: 42%
Version: 1

At the time of its certification, the City of Plantation was the smallest city to achieve FGBC Green Local Government certification. Sustainability efforts concentrated on their policies and daily activities, including recycling toner cartridges, reusing scrap paper for note pads, and donating end of life computer equipment to non-profit organizations. In addition, they utilize drought tolerant landscaping and have qualified as a Tree City USA community for 30 years. Community education efforts include hosting an annual "Green Day" which provides information on living more sustainably to residents and businesses. Their "Operation Habitat" campaign helps schools, businesses and residents learn how to create backyard wildlife habitats. Plantation's waste management department developed a cost structure by the bag, encouraging solid waste reduction and recycling. On request, Plantation provides a real-time water monitoring device for residents, which helps encourage water conservation and identifying leaks. The City also has a disaster mitigation program that identifies reuse and recycling opportunities for C&D debris, fallen trees, and other salvageable materials.

Sarasota County
Certified: 9/24/08 Expired, Recertification Pending
Level: Gold
Points: 47%
Version: 1

Sarasota County is recognized as a leader in the greening of local governments and to date holds the highest certification score within the FGBC Green Local Government Certification program. The County has adopted the green cleaning and maintenance practices recommended by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and have adopted the FGBC and LEED green building standards as the official minimum criteria for future government buildings. They have also encouraged green building in the commercial and residential sector by offering incentives for buildings and developments that meet the FGBC, LEED and EnergyStar standards. Preservation has also been a top priority in the county, and they share, maintain and promote that beauty through eco-tourism. There website provides volumes of sustainability education, and their interactive Green Map constantly promotes green projects within the county and is a fun, easy way to find locally available green activities, organizations and facilities.
http://www.scgov.net/greenmap/

South Daytona
Certified 8/7/09 Expired
Level: Gold
Points: 41%
Version: 2

Photo Caption: Mayor Blaine O'Neal (L) accepts the FGBC Green Local Government certification recognition from FGBC Board member Stephanie Thomas-Rees, September 8, 2009. The frame is made from river recovered® wood donated by Goodwin Heart Pine located in Micanopy, FL.

The City of South Daytona was the first city in Volusia County to achieve the FGBC Green Local Government Certification, demonstrating their commitment to sustainability through numerous local government policies and programs. They are dedicated to the conservation of natural resources, operate a reuse center, protect environmentally sensitive lands, and have implemented green fleet management practices. The City is addressing water conservation by adopting Florida Friendly Landscape principles and installing automated faucets at city facilities.

St. Cloud
Certified: 8/16/11
Level: Silver
Points: 21%
Version: 2

The designation demonstrates exemplary leadership by St. Cloud Mayor Rebecca Borders and other elected officials who provided the framework and support to move forward with the process that helps to better manage the cost of government. Green achievements included:
• Maintain an office, person, or group to coordinate current and future green activities
• New employee orientation includes the city’s commitment to the environment
• Organize green building seminars and/or training for staff and elected officials
• Train and certify select staff as certified arborists
• Employ green cleaning and maintenance procedures
• Require recycling at all local government buildings
• Develop a disaster waste management plan
• Provide city-wide chemical/hazardous waste collection
• Create a reclaimed water infrastructure
• Use LED traffic lights
• Encourage mixed-use zoning / development
• Maintain or reduce net impervious surface area through zoning decisions
• Enact and enforce a tree preservation or land-clearing ordinance
• Enact a septic system replacement ordinance
• Enact a landscaping ordinance for new construction
• Enact open burning regulations
• Use of alternative fuel vehicles and/or bicycle patrol for urban/neighborhood areas
• Firing ranges utilize non-lead bullets or trap and collect fragments
• Police trained in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED)
• Offer free or discounted green products to the public
• Recycle end-of-life electronic equipment and operate local government computer and equipment reuse center
• Enact policy so all computer electronic equipment purchased has conservation features
• Mandatory recycling of typical recyclables and C&D debris for homes and businesses
• Mandatory recycling program for large volumes of C&D debris
• Offer waste assessments to businesses
• Offer educational materials to increase recycling program participation
• Enforce watering restrictions during meter reads
• Enact a rain sensor ordinance applicable to all functioning automatic irrigation systems
• Create an education campaign for water use reduction (xeriscaping, rainwater collection, etc.)
• Achieve Florida Main Street Designation
• Develop a historic preservation ordinance
• Become a Tree City USA
• Take part in Florida Clean Marina program
• Operate a website dedicated to St Cloud’s green program and develop environmental education content for the website, television programs, etc.
• Provide public transportation route searching via the internet
• Offer mulched yard waste to community
• Involve students in green projects within the school
• Maintain organic community gardens

St. Lucie County
Certified: 4/26/10
Level: Gold
Points: 43%
Version: 2

St. Lucie's green team receives the FGBC Green Local Government flag and framed certificate. From Left: St. Lucie County Commissioner Chris Dzadovsky, Environmental Resources Department/Education & Outreach Coordinator Sandra Bogan, Commissioner Doug Coward, Chairman Charles Grande, FGBC Board members Cindy Hall and Kyle Abney, Commissioner Chris Craft, Clerk of the Court Joe Smith, and Commissioner Paula Lewis.

St. Lucie County implemented a county-wide Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) program, employs green cleaning policies and practices, and adopted a green buildings ordinance. It also requires recycling at local government buildings. The County understands the importance of water conservation and has undertaken a community stormwater education campaign, offers water audits to homes and businesses, is a partner in the groundwater guardian program, structures water rates based on consumption to promote conservation, maintains Florida friendly landscapes, and operates a Florida Yards & Neighborhoods outreach program. The fire department collects and reuses water during training exercises. The County encourages green business through the Green Collar task force program, takes part in community energy efficiency workshops, and assists low-income neighborhoods with an energy renovation program. St. Lucie County provides bicycle racks at all public amenities, and as an official local government policy has adopted the Healthy Street Design to encourage a more walkable, livable and enjoyable community. The school district maintains a recycling program, utilizes biodiesel in school busses, monitors and tracks building energy use, operates an equipment reuse program, and involves students and teachers in green projects in and outside of the schools. As reported in their FGBC Local Government Certification Report, ultimately sustainability is not about undertaking green actions, but rather, greening every action undertaken.

St. Pete Beach
Certified: 8/11/11
Level: Silver
Points: 21%
Version: 2

St. Petersburg
Certified: 12/1/06 Expired, Recertification Pending
Level: Silver
Points: 26%
Version: 1

Tallahassee
Recertified: 7/15/13
Level: Gold
Points: 57.6%
Version: 4

The city of Tallahassee is the second local government to complete the five-year recertification process for the Florida Green Building Coalition's Green Local Government designation. And with a score of 57.6 percent of its 363 applicable points and its exceptional commitment to the certification process through the leadership of Cynthia Barber, Director of Environmental Policy & Energy Services, and Adam Jacobs, Strategic Programs Evaluator, Tallahassee beats Miami-Dade County for the #1 position among all 44 FGBC certified local governments. View Tallahassee's 2013 Green Initiatives Annual Report.

Certified: 12/12/07; Upgrade: 1/5/09 Expired
Level: Gold
Points: 42%
Version: 1

The City of Tallahassee has continued to demonstrate leadership in "Greening Local Government" in the state of Florida. Originally certified at the silver level in December 2007, within a year the City had pursued an upgrade and achieved the gold-level FGBC Green Local Government Certification, making it the first "city" to reach the gold-level accomplishment. Tallahassee regularly organizes green building training to educate its elected officials and staff, and it includes green principles in new employee orientation by providing information on available energy saving features, recycling guidelines, and alternative commuting options and incentives. Tallahassee promotes and tracks eco-tourism, participates in a speakers bureau, and applies Florida Friendly Landscaping principles (FY&N) at its facilities. As a utility, the City of Tallahassee offers green power, renewable energy credits and distributed generation incentives. The City also encourages the proper disposal of hazardous waste by rewarding participants with utility rebates and energy-saving CFLs, and it operates alternative fueling stations. 

Tamarac
Certified: 5/19/08; Upgrade: 5/4/10
Level: Gold
Points: 41%
Version: 1

Originally certified on May 19, 2008 with 31 percent (Silver level), the City of Tamarac continues to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability by increasing environmental strategies and activities which have earned them the FGBC Gold-level designation on May 4, 2010. Tamarac's commitment to outstanding environmental stewardship are evidenced by their Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) training; citizen education programs on water source, water quality and water conservation; and new bicycle racks at all public amenities in an effort to encourage biking over driving. Additionally, many of Tamarac's medians, streetscapes and facilities have been certified as Florida Friendly Landscapes, and Tamarac is working on programs that will offer affordable green housing to all public employees.

Tampa
Certified: 1/22/09 Expired, Recertification Pending
Level: Gold
Points: 41%
Version: 1

The City of Tampa was the second city to reach gold-level certification with an impressive score of 41%. As part of their efforts, the City offers incentives for green commercial and residential building as well as incentives for residential EnergyStar certification. Their water conservation programs are widely recognized and include car wash and fountain standards, conservation through education, incentives, and rebates for low-flow fixtures. They also apply Florida Friendly Landscaping principles, utilize integrated pest management to reduce the use of pesticides, and have conducted a city-wide energy audit of their facilities in an effort to measure and identify goals to reduce energy consumption.

Tarpon Springs
Recertified: 8/20/13
Level: Silver
Points: 34%
Version: 4

Certified: 10/8/08 Expired
Level: Silver
Points: 21%
Version: 1

The City of Tarpon Springs was the first municipality application organized from an office of public safety. The Tarpon Springs Police Department utilizes lead-free (non-toxic) ammunition at its firing range. After each use, officers are tasked with cleaning the range and recycling both the bullet residue and spent casings. Simulator training systems employed further reduce the use of environmentally harmful components. The city adopted the green cleaning and maintenance procedures recommended by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FL DEP) in all of their government buildings, which helps reduce the use of hazardous chemicals and improves indoor air quality. Tarpon Springs ordered an extensive energy audit to identify opportunities for energy conservation. They encourage their employees to carpool through a preferred parking program and encourage residents to bicycle by installing security racks at all public amenities. Their landscaping and tree protection ordinance was written to promote water conservation, energy conservation and to reduce heat island effect through shading and use of native plants, while preserving existing vegetation. In the event of a natural or other disaster, a debris management plan is in place that calls for a recycling strategy for salvageable materials. Yard waste is regularly collected, recycled as mulch and offered back to the community. Tarpon Springs was the recipient of the 2007 Florida Department of Environmental Protection Wastewater Plant Operations Excellence Award, and encourage their customers to conserve through education and the rate structure. The City utilizes closed landfill management practices.

Volusia County
Certified: 8/11/10
Level: Silver
Points: 32%
Version: 2

Volusia County officials and "green team" receive the FGBC Green Local Government certification plaque and flag from FGBC Board member Stephanie Thomas-Rees (3rd from right) and Ralph Locke (2nd from right) who has been instrumental in educatng area residents on green benefits

Volusia County installed LED traffic lights, utilizes green cleaning practices, created a reclaimed water infrastructure, and provides recycling (including fishing line) at their beaches. It provides a public transportation network with connectivity to a bicycle and pedestrian-friendly circulation system. Community residents can search online for route information plus, find information on carpool and vanpool assistance. The County also operates a public reuse store, encourages green building and development, utilizes green fleet management, and encourages employee environmental innovation to save fuel, electricity and other resources through a "Go Green, Win Green" reward program. Economic Development, tourism, and an enhanced quality of life environment are promoted through the ECHO tourism campaign, which provides hiking, biking and blue trails, as well as heritage and cultural value within the county. [More]

Wellington
Certified: 2/28/12
Level: Gold
Points: 42%
Version: 1

Winter Park
Certified: 8/25/11
Level: Gold
Points: 41%
Version: 1

(l-r) FGBC representative Jeremy Nelson, Mayor Ken Bradley, Troy Attaway, Tim Maslow, and Steven Pategas

In 2008, Winter Park adopted a resolution to pursue Green Local Government certification. A Sustainability Program was then developed as a means of coordinating the city's green efforts. New projects and policies implemented to increase sustainability include: requiring all public buildings be constructed to green standards; retrofitting existing buildings with federal stimulus dollars to reduce energy and water usage and greenhouse gas emissions; passing a Complete Streets resolution to design future street projects that accommodate various modes of transportation including pedestrians and bicyclists; installing LED street lights; adopting an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) policy; preserving green spaces; and promoting community gardening and local food programs.